Newsletter

Dentistry Art and Science

It is easy to appreciate the beauty of a loved one’s smile. Dentists, however, believe that the true beauty lies in the sciencesmile of a smile. To the dental professionals, a beautiful smile is one that is proportionate. Countless scientific studies have given us guidelines to reach that goal of beauty. Here are some of the many parameters dentists use to evaluate and improve the beauty of a smile:

  1. Smile line: A smile line connects the biting edges of your top teeth. The most attractive smile lines gently follow the curve of the lower lip. Uneven or flat smile lines may indicate misaligned or misshaped teeth.
  2. Tooth shade: A natural bright tooth color that is suitable for the person’s look and age. Over-bleached teeth can look unnatural, and distract from the overall look.
  3. Over Crowding and excessive spacing between teeth.
  4. Midline: Front teeth should be centered and in line with the nose and symmetry of the face. Moreover, the midline of the upper teeth should coincide with the midline of the lower teeth.

Even with all the scientific parameters considered, a beautiful smile remains subjective. Many of us have attractive smiles that do not fall within the scientific averages. Let us help you reach your own personal goal for a radiant smile by calling our office to explore all that modern dentistry has to offer.

Goodbye Cavities … Hello Cavity Prevention!

Goodbye Cavities … Hello Cavity Prevention!

 

Everyone is susceptible to cavities, and I mean everyone. In fact, they are so common and lacking in mystery that most people think they have a good understanding of them. Interestingly, that’s not what I see and hear when I talk to some patients at my practice, so I thought I’d take a few minutes to go back to the basics with you.

 

What is a cavity? “Cavity” actually refers to the hole in your enamel that is formed when you have caries – the bacterial disease that causes them. When the food we eat interacts with bacteria in our mouths, the result is a chemical reaction which produces an acid which can erode the enamel (outside covering) of a tooth. Eventually, a small hole will form in the tooth’s surface. This is a cavity, and it’s an open door to infection and decay.

 

What is a root cavity? For adults, root cavities are a concern. This is when the cavity appears not in the crown of the tooth, but on the root. Years of gum erosion from brushing too hard, as well as from the natural effects of ageing, causes gums to recede, making the root vulnerable to acid attacks.

 

What is a filling cavity? A filling cavity forms adjacent to the edge of a filling or in the part of a tooth that has been exposed by a broken filling. Sometimes there are micro cracks in older filling material that allow bacteria to seep in and under a filling. You won’t likely notice them, but I can identify them during your checkup.

 

How can you prevent cavities? Nutrition is one important component. Tooth decay is promoted by starchy foods like breads, cereals, and crackers which feed bacteria-causing tooth decay. Potentially harmful sugars are found in natural foods such as fruits and fruit drinks, as well as milk, ketchup, salad dressings, and some canned vegetables.

 

I know you understand that sugar contributes to the development of tooth decay, and you may have switched to diet soda because of that. Sorry – it’s not that simple. Diet sodas don’t have any sugar, but they do contain larger amounts of phosphoric and citric acid to enhance flavor. Don’t brush right away, though – you risk damaging softened enamel. A tall glass of water immediately after will help, but better yet, why not choose the very best thirst quencher in the first place? Water has no fat, no caffeine, and no acid!

 

There’s absolutely no mystery to how to prevent cavities. At home, you should brush and floss effectively, eat a balanced diet, and use fluoride toothpaste. And come and see me regularly so that together we can monitor your oral health.

Sincerely yours,

 

Dr. Yuval Azulay DMD
Upper Dublin Family Dentistry

3515 W. Moreland Rd
Willow Grove, PA 19090
215-657-3770

7847 Old York Rd
Elkins Park, PA 19027
215-782-8420

Info@udfd.com
www.udfd.com

Schedule online now

© Patient News

Calcium, How much is enough?

Calcium, How much is enough?

There’s a recurring news story about calcium supplements that a number of my patients have found worrisome and confusing. It’s worth touching on and it reminded me that really, it’s an opportunity to talk to you about calcium’s importance to oral and overall health.

First the worrisome story. In August 2010 The British Medical Journal published a review of studies about women at risk for fractures and loss of bone density. Surprisingly, they discovered that women taking calcium supplements had a modest increased risk of heart attacks and no benefit from the supplements. Their recommendation seems reasonable: a reassessment of the role of calcium supplements in osteoporosis management.

Yet if you are over 60, your physician may recommend a calcium intake of 1,000-1,200 mg per day. If you have any concerns about the relative benefits of starting or continuing with supplements, I encourage you to discuss them with your physician. Their value to you depends on your individual health status as well as your diet.

Any balanced diet isn’t complete without calcium, the main nutritional mineral needed for building strong teeth and bones, which contain 99% of the body’s supply. However, the remaining 1% circulates in the blood to aid heart function, blood clotting, the conduction of nerve impulses, and muscle contraction.

If the level of calcium does not remain constant and adequate, your body can pull calcium from your bones which, over time, will lead to osteoporosis which can result in broken bones. Inadequate calcium intake has also been linked to health issues such as hypertension and toxemia in pregnancy, which is characterized by high blood pressure.

In general, experts believe that North Americans, particularly adults, do not consume enough calcium each day. But how much calcium do you need for a lifetime of healthy teeth and bones?
The most effective amount for adults is from 800-1,200 mg of calcium a day combined with a good exercise program. Remember vitamin D3 for helping your body absorb calcium.

Calcium is especially important for growing children. We recommend 500-700 mg a day of calcium for children depending on their age and significantly more for teenagers and expectant or nursing mothers.

Many things we eat and drink have calcium in them, with dairy products usually being your best source. Adults can get their recommended daily amount by drinking 3-4 glasses of milk or an equivalent measure of yogurt or cheese (1½ ounces of cheese equals an eight-ounce glass of milk). You can add milk to soups, sauces, and desserts. Coffee cream, artificial creamer, and whipped topping as well as cream cheese, sour cream, and whipping cream, contain little or no calcium, but you can replace sour cream or cream cheese with fat-free yogurt or low-fat cottage cheese mixed with 1 tablespoon lemon juice or vinegar.

If you can’t tolerate dairy, then fortified alternatives made from almonds, soy, or rice are your options, as well as fresh vegetables such as spinach, broccoli and collard greens, and canned seafood like sardines and salmon. Nuts like almonds are also high in calcium.

Regardless of your age, calcium provides many benefits for your oral and overall health. If you’re not sure you’re getting enough dietary calcium, please ask your physician, my dental team, or me to suggest ways to achieve the calcium intake that’s right for you.

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Yuval Azulay DMD
Upper Dublin Family Dentistry

3515 W. Moreland Rd
Willow Grove, PA 19090
215-657-3770

7847 Old York Rd
Elkins Park, PA 19027
215-782-8420

www.udfd.com
© Patient News

Oral Cancer Check

Did you know that if you’re over 60 years of age, you are in the group which is at the greatest risk for developing oral cancer? Because early intervention is critical, be proactive and examine your mouth on the first of each month – mark it in your calendar. Checking is easy: with a mirror under good lighting, visually check your lips, gums, the insides of your cheeks, your tongue (and under your tongue), and your palate. Then use your finger to feel all around the inside of your mouth. Look for white patches that won’t come off when scraped with a fingernail or ones that bleed when you do, a lump or bump especially if only on one side of your mouth, swollen, red, or bleeding gums, or any persistent sores. Make sure you call us immediately if you notice anything unusual.

Elkins Park Dentist

Elkins Park Dentist

Looking for the best dentist to handle a wide range of tooth-related health concerns is not always easy. With so many dentists available in most areas, finding the best dentist is like looking for a needle in a haystack. While it is not always easy to find the best dentist, having a few ideas of what to look for can narrow the selection to a few options so only the top dentists in the area are considered.

Finding the best dentist Elkins Park starts with the procedures available in the office. Those who are looking for the best must ensure the dentist is able to perform all of the basic requirements for tooth health. A dentist Elkins Park should understanding the concerns of patients, provide a wide range of procedures and ensure that patients are as comfortable as possible based on the particular needs of the teeth.

Root canals Elkins Park are often considered a specialized treatment, but the best dentists will often perform the procedure personally. By getting root canals Elkins Park worked on by a professional who is able to perform a wide range of procedures, it is easier to ensure he or she has the practice necessary for the best possible results.

Upper Dublin Family Dentistry has some of the best dentists in Elkins Park and the area, but that simply requires looking for better quality within the options available. Dentists have a responsibility for their patient’s health, so the best dentists will always take measures to put anxiety or fear to rest.

Upper Dublin Family Dentistry

  • 3515 W. Moreland Rd.   Willow Grove, PA 19090   (215) 657-3770
  • 7847 Old York Rd.   Elkins Park, PA 19027               (215) 782-8420
  • Book your appointment online:  www.udfd.com

Schedule online now